The Wonders of Yellow

From the palest lemon to the deepest gold, the sunniest colour on the colour spectrum is yellow and it breathes life into the garden as the dark and coldness of winter gives way to spring. It is no surprise that so many spring flowers fall into this colour group, as lighter colours stand out to the few early pollinators that are around. Why not create a yellow themed border in your garden with some of the shrubs and perennials below?

Narcissus 'Minnow' © GAP Photos/Jonathan Buckley

Narcissus ‘Minnow’ © GAP Photos/Jonathan Buckley

1. Narcissus ‘Minnow’ – Daffodil ‘Minnow’
A dainty two-tone daffodil with multiple flowerheads on each stem. This is also a dwarf variety which looks fantastic in pots.

Eranthis hyemalis © GAP Photos/Jonathan Buckley

Eranthis hyemalis © GAP Photos/Jonathan Buckley

2. Eranthis hyemalis – Winter aconite
Aconites start flowering in late winter, giving one of the earliest signs that spring is on its way. They provide cheerful colour along a border edge and sparkle when mass planted under deciduous trees and shrubs.

Crocus 'Fuscotinctus'  © GAP Photos/John Glover

Crocus ‘Fuscotinctus’ © GAP Photos/John Glover

3. Crocus chrysanthus var. fuscotinctus
Another early flowering plant, appearing in February and March and flowering a deep, glowing golden with fabulous purple markings.

Primula vulgaris © GAP Photos/Joanna Kossak

Primula vulgaris © GAP Photos/Joanna Kossak

4. Primula vulgaris – Wild Primrose
Available widely, this native primrose provides delicate pale, yellow flowers which stand out against their emerald leaves. Perfect in a woodland garden.

Primula veris - Cowslip © GAP Photos/Juliette Wade

Primula veris – Cowslip © GAP Photos/Juliette Wade

5. Primula veris – Common Cowslip
Another native Primula, which naturalises well and looks good in a meadow-style border.

Coronilla valentina subsp. glauca 'Citrina'. Bastard senna © GAP Photos/Jonathan Buckley

Coronilla valentina subsp. glauca ‘Citrina’. Bastard senna © GAP Photos/Jonathan Buckley

6. Coronilla valentina subsp. glauca ‘Citrina’. Bastard senna
A fantastic evergreen shrub, with interesting blue-green foliage and pretty pea-like flowers. It is scented, grows well in containers and can be trained against a wall.

Forsythia 'Lynwood' underplanted Viola cornuta 'Etain' in white pot - © GAP Photos/Friedrich Strauss

Forsythia ‘Lynwood’ underplanted Viola cornuta ‘Etain’ in white pot – © GAP Photos/Friedrich Strauss

7. Forsythia ×  intermedia ‘Lynwood Variety’
A brilliantly versatile shrub which can be used as a feature plant and as a deciduous hedge. The vibrant yellow flowers appear before the foliage from February to April.

Erythronium 'Pagoda' - dog's tooth violet - © GAP Photos/Joanna Kossak

Erythronium ‘Pagoda’ – dog’s tooth violet – © GAP Photos/Joanna Kossak

8. Erythronium ‘Pagoda’ – Dog’s Tooth Violet
The sweet, nodding and intensely yellow flowers make this shade tolerant perennial a winner. Plant in moisture retentive borders. The flowers, that appear March to April, are set off by its smooth bright green leaves.

Tulipa sylvestris - © GAP Photos/Christina Bollen

Tulipa sylvestris – © GAP Photos/Christina Bollen

9. Tulipa sylvestris – wild tulip
A good tulip for naturalising. The cheerful yellow flowers of this native bulbous perennial will light up areas under trees.

Helleborus x hybridus 'Yellow with Red Spots' - © GAP Photos/Howard Rice

Helleborus x hybridus ‘Yellow with Red Spots’ – © GAP Photos/Howard Rice

10. Helleborus x hybridus ‘Yellow with Red Spots’
Hellebores come in so many colours, but the pale yellow colour of this hybrid’s flowers really set off the red markings.