Monthly Archives: May 2019

Chelsea Trend: Living Roofs

The popularity in living walls has been increasing for years, so it was only a matter of time before living roofs started to appear in show garden designs. As living space comes at a premium, and fewer people find themselves with sufficient outdoor space to be able to grow plants, using all available surfaces is a valuable solution. It is an exciting step forward to see living walls in action at flower shows, aiming to inspire us of what can be achieved and the positive environmental and mental impact it can have on us all.

 

The Warners Distillery Garden,  view of the central dry stone pavillion building and  living roof with Allium schoenoprasum,  various Sedums and Thymus with water feature of Copper fins and rill - designed by Andy Ewinz - Designer: Helen Elks-Smith - Construction: Bowles and Wyer. Sponsor: Warners Gin - © GAP Photos/Richard Bloom

The Warners Distillery Garden, view of the central dry stone pavillion building and living roof with Allium schoenoprasum, various Sedums and Thymus with water feature of Copper fins and rill – designed by Andy Ewinz – Designer: Helen Elks-Smith – Construction: Bowles and Wyer. Sponsor: Warners Gin – © GAP Photos/Richard Bloom

This urban living roof in The Warner’s Distillery Garden, designed by Helen Elks-Smith, includes suitable planting for a living roof, with perennials such as sedums and thyme that can cope with full sun, are draught- tolerant and are attractive to beneficial wildlife.

The Silent Pool Gin Garden, view of sunken garden with glass wall water feature, corrugated metal fencing, recycled concrete pillars supporting a roof with water garden, old limestone boulders,  clay brick wall and paving,  copper swing chair, roses, grasses – Designer: David Neale - Sponsor: Silent Pool Gin - ©  GAP Photos/Stephen Studd

The Silent Pool Gin Garden, view of sunken garden with glass wall water feature, corrugated metal fencing, recycled concrete pillars supporting a roof with water garden, old limestone boulders, clay brick wall and paving, copper swing chair, roses, grasses – Designer: David Neale – Sponsor: Silent Pool Gin – © GAP Photos/Stephen Studd

 

The Silent Pool Gin Garden, designed by David Neale, features a contemporary living roof which also provides a shaded area below for unwinding.

The Montessori Centenary Children's Garden, designed by Jody Lidgard, sponsored by Montessori Centre International City Asset Management, RHS Chelsea Flower Show, 2019 - © GAP Photos/Anna Omiotek-Tott

The Montessori Centenary Children’s Garden, designed by Jody Lidgard, sponsored by Montessori Centre International City Asset Management, RHS Chelsea Flower Show, 2019 – © GAP Photos/Anna Omiotek-Tott

The Montessori Centenary Children’s Garden, designed by Jody Lidgard, features edible living walls, hydroponic technology, and a wildlife pond, as well as a living roof – a garden showcasing the future possibilities of where technology and horticulture can take garden design.

Chelsea Trend: Use of water

This year many of the show gardens included water, with a mixture of naturalistic ponds, contemporary pools and water features, showcasing the wide range of ways water can be used in a garden. Incorporating water in gardens has numerous benefits. Ponds are a haven for wildlife and the sound and sight of running water has a calming effect on people. It is also a feature that can be widely adapted to suit the style of the garden, from country cottage to modern and formal.

 

The Trailfinders 'Undiscovered Latin America' Garden at RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2019. View of the bright red brige and water fall over a stream. Design: Jonathan Snow. Sponsor: Trailfinders - © GAP Photos

The Trailfinders ‘Undiscovered Latin America’ Garden at RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2019. View of the bright red brige and water fall over a stream. Design: Jonathan Snow. Sponsor: Trailfinders – © GAP Photos

The Trail Finders ‘Undiscovered Latin America’ Garden, designed by Jonathan Snow, featured a full cascading waterfall, which could be admired at close proximity via a dramatic red walkway, giving the viewer a really immersive experience.

 

The Kampo No Niwa Garden, view of wood pergola with wooden table and bench seats and cushions, stone patio with water feature rill, dry stone wall with waterfall – Designer: Kazuto Kashiwakura and Miko Sato- Sponsor: Kampo No Niwa 300 sponsors. RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2019 - © GAP Photos/Stephen Studd

The Kampo No Niwa Garden, view of wood pergola with wooden table and bench seats and cushions, stone patio with water feature rill, dry stone wall with waterfall – Designer: Kazuto Kashiwakura and Miko Sato- Sponsor: Kampo No Niwa 300 sponsors. RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2019 – © GAP Photos/Stephen Studd

Designers Kazuto Kashiwakura and Miki Sato used a subtler method to include water in the design, with naturalistic pools and low narrow rills, in the Kampo no Niwa garden.

 

David Harbers bronze sculpture in The Savills and David Harber Garden. Designed by Andrew Duff, Sponsored by David Harber Savills, RHS Chelsea Flower Show, 2019 - © GAP Photos/Annaick Guitteny

David Harbers bronze sculpture in The Savills and David Harber Garden. Designed by Andrew Duff, Sponsored by David Harber Savills, RHS Chelsea Flower Show, 2019 – © GAP Photos/Annaick Guitteny

In the Savills and David Harber Garden, designer Andrew Duff incorporated a large, contemporary sculpture rising from a calm pool, which complimented the subtle planting and helped to create a serene feeling.

Chelsea Trend: Children and Gardening

A recurring theme inspiring a few of this year’s show gardens was Children’s engagement with horticulture, nature and gardening. These gardens were designed to be used predominantly by children, and really highlighted the importance and effectiveness of immersing children within horticulture. From considering the importance of technology and plants in the future, to the magic and playfulness that nature can inspire in children, these gardens emphasised the need to engage future generations with gardening and plants on an everyday level.

The Montessori Centenary Children's Garden  a view through the gate leading to childrens classroom and play area. Plants include:  Red Campion - Silene dioica growing on the roof,   Designer: Jody Lidgard, Sponsors: Montessori Centre International. RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2019 - © GAP Photos/Jacqui Hurst

The Montessori Centenary Children’s Garden a view through the gate leading to childrens classroom and play area. Plants include: Red Campion – Silene dioica growing on the roof, Designer: Jody Lidgard, Sponsors: Montessori Centre International. RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2019 – © GAP Photos/Jacqui Hurst

The Montessori Centenary Children’s Garden, designed by Jody Lidgard, centred around children’s interest and education in plants and gardening, and how technology will continue to interact with horticulture in the future

Modern and colourful living area with benches, tables and foliage planting.  Designed by Kate Gould Gardens, sponsored by Greenfingers Charity, RHS Chelsea Flower Show, 2019 - © GAP Photos/Stephen Studd

Modern and colourful living area with benches, tables and foliage planting. Designed by Kate Gould Gardens, sponsored by Greenfingers Charity, RHS Chelsea Flower Show, 2019 – © GAP Photos/Stephen Studd

In the Greenfingers Charity Garden, designer Kate Gould, used a cool and calming colour palette and smooth sloped pathways easy to create a garden sympathetic to children with complex needs,


The RHS Back to Nature Garden, designed by HRH The Duchess of Cambridge with Andree Davies and Adam White, drew upon childhood memories of playing, discovering and learning in nature, with an emphasis on family living