Monthly Archives: May 2017

Mallards in May

A lovely garden nestled in a Wiltshire valley.

Euphorbia characias 'Wulfenii', Rhododendron luteum with Myosotis - Forget me nots and cream Polyanthus lining a path - © Lynn Keddie/GAP Photos

Euphorbia characias ‘Wulfenii’, Rhododendron luteum with Myosotis – Forget me nots and cream Polyanthus lining a path – © Lynn Keddie/GAP Photos

Nestled beside the Downs on a tributary of the river Avon in the heart of Wiltshire is a garden full of contrasts. Beside the river, bog-loving plants thrive, while in the main part of the garden, in the shade of a magnificent ancient Beech wood, a tapestry of colour and texture patterns the ground.

Beyond the wood a small wildflower meadow is spangled with white Narcissus in spring. Beyond the meadow, there are stunning views as the fields stretch out over the Downs.

To view this feature in full, click here.

De Bojem

Decorative urn underplanted with Stachys byzantina - De Bojem Annie Meuwissen, Belgium - © Robert Mabic/GAP Photos

Decorative urn underplanted with Stachys byzantina – De Bojem Annie Meuwissen, Belgium – © Robert Mabic/GAP Photos

Annie Meuwissen’s Belgian country garden in late spring.

Hornbeam archway and grass path leading to the long borders - De Bojem Annie Meuwissen, Belgium - © Robert Mabic/GAP Photos

Hornbeam archway and grass path leading to the long borders – De Bojem Annie Meuwissen, Belgium – © Robert Mabic/GAP Photos

The original garden at The Bojem consisted of an old fruit meadow enclosed with hedging and surrounded by fields. Annie Meuwissen has transformed the garden. In the spring and summer there are surprising colour combinations with many perennials, roses and clematis that are pleasing to the eye. In winter the shapes of the trees and shrubs provide continued interest. The entrance to the garden leads through the gate in the enclosed patio with pond area, this was once the child sandpit and place for swings. Then comes the first formal area, the geometric rose garden and long colourful borders reaching to the open horizon. There is a large Hosta collection along a woodland path. The clever landscaping contributes heavily to the beauty of this garden.

To view this feature in full, click here.

Ocklynge Manor

View across lawn of colourful mixed containers - Ocklynge Manor - © Abigail Rex/GAP Photos

View across lawn of colourful mixed containers – Ocklynge Manor – © Abigail Rex/GAP Photos

This is an unusual ½ acre garden in that it sits on chalk, therefore the owners had an initial battle getting plants, especially herbaceous, to succeed.

With difficult chalk soil, the owners solution was to use container planting to achieve stunning results. There is also emphasis on the use of varied textured and shaped foliage. Interestingly, it is also a very low maintenance garden. Undoubtedly other garden owners with gardens on difficult geography could take tips from Mr and Mrs Dugdill. The children’s book illustrator Mabel Lucie Attwell lived here during the 1930s. The garden is open under the NGS in May.

To view this feature in full, click here.