Monthly Archives: November 2016

Yarlington House

Stilt hedge of pleached Limes - © Heather Edwards/GAP Photos

Stilt hedge of pleached Limes – © Heather Edwards/GAP Photos

Yarlington House is an imposing red brick house in Somerset built in 1782. Owned by Carolyn and Charles de Salis.

Laburnum tunnel, leading to statue of Frances de Salis - © Heather Edwards/GAP Photos

Laburnum tunnel, leading to statue of Frances de Salis – © Heather Edwards/GAP Photos

Yarlington was once used as a home for evacuees in the war and boasts an original walled garden with glasshouse, dovecote, ha-ha with parkland views, Rose garden, Lily pond, pergola and Italianate sunken garden. Glorious busy in the Summer and well known for its’ numerous charity fairs, galas and weddings, this exposed garden is also transformed into a silent winter wonderland, when fragrant shrubs and evergreens are draped with frost.

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Broughton Grange in Winter

Parterre - Broughton Grange, Oxfordshire - © Abigail Rex/GAP Photos

Parterre – Broughton Grange, Oxfordshire – © Abigail Rex/GAP Photos

Broughton Grange has permanent structure making it interesting throughout the year.

Box parterre and decorative wooden obelisks in winter - Broughton Grange, Oxfordshire - © Abigail Rex/GAP Photos

Box parterre and decorative wooden obelisks in winter – Broughton Grange, Oxfordshire – © Abigail Rex/GAP Photos

Broughton Grange is full of evergreen topiary which has impressive permanent structure throughout the bare winter months. The hard landscaping, designed by Tom Stuart-Smith incorporates clipped Yew, a contemporary pool and rill, a knot garden, a parterre with obelisks. In the spring and summer months, the sedate feel of the garden is replaced by a blaze of colourful planting, which changes slightly every year.

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Winter Containers

Terracotta containers with winter planting. including Skimmia japonica 'Magic Marlot', Skimmia japonica, Cyclamen hederifolium, Erica 'George Rendall' and ornamental cabbage - © Nicola Stocken/GAP Photos

Terracotta containers with winter planting. including Skimmia japonica ‘Magic Marlot’, Skimmia japonica, Cyclamen hederifolium, Erica ‘George Rendall’ and ornamental cabbage – © Nicola Stocken/GAP Photos

Containers provide the most versatile way of creating eye-catching focal points that can be easily moved around, and changed with the seasons.

Container planting is infinitely adaptable and, the smaller the space, the larger a part it plays with larger pots, planted with evergreen, architectural plants, creating permanent features, visual punctuation marks that highlight key axises within a space. On the other hand, there are ephemeral displays that are regularly swapped over to ensure an unbroken succession of colour throughout the seasons.

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