Category Archives: Garden Shows

Not long until Chelsea!!

The M and G garden, Gold medal winner. RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2014. Stipa gigantea in sunlight, Zelkova serrata tree, Allium cristophii, Iris Florentina, Octagonal Water feature made from Bath limestone - © GAP Photos/Stephen Studd/Designer: Cleve West, Sponsor: M&G investments

The M and G garden, Gold medal winner. RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2014. Stipa gigantea in sunlight, Zelkova serrata tree, Allium cristophii, Iris Florentina, Octagonal Water feature made from Bath limestone – © GAP Photos/Stephen Studd/Designer: Cleve West, Sponsor: M&G investments

It’s that time of year when there is a sense of excitement in the GAP Gardens office as the Chelsea Flower Show gets closer!

Garden designer Jodie Fedorko. The Old Forge Artisan Garden for Motor Neurone Disease Association - RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2015 - © GAP Photos/Joanna Kossak/Designers: Jodie Fedorko and Martin Anderson for the Motor Neurone Disease Association

Garden designer Jodie Fedorko. The Old Forge Artisan Garden for Motor Neurone Disease Association – RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2015 – © GAP Photos/Joanna Kossak/Designers: Jodie Fedorko and Martin Anderson for the Motor Neurone Disease Association

So what better way is there to look forward to it than to look over some pictures of the past few years. We have picked a small selection of images which brings the show to life, the designs, the gardens and of course the people!

The Telegraph Garden, RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2014, gold medal winner. View across garden- Pleached limes. Lawn with corners of clipped box mounds to wall of marble with white metal lattice seats. Lemons in terracota pots. Iris - © GAP Photos/Charles Hawes/Design: Tommaso del Buono, Paul Gazerwitz. Sponsor: The Telegraph

The Telegraph Garden, RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2014, gold medal winner. View across garden- Pleached limes. Lawn with corners of clipped box mounds to wall of marble with white metal lattice seats. Lemons in terracota pots. Iris – © GAP Photos/Charles Hawes/Design: Tommaso del Buono, Paul Gazerwitz. Sponsor: The Telegraph

Why not take a few minutes out of your day to look at these images and the many more on our website.

A thirst for inspiration

Water always features strongly in show gardens, and this year was no exception. Tasteful rills and reflective pools were plentiful, yet some designers pushed the boundaries to bring new, innovative ways to incorporate this element into their gardens.

Cleverly incorporated into a smaller space, Ruth Willmott’s black, reflective pools of the Breakthrough Breast Cancer Garden show how you can balance water and plantings perfectly.

Soft pink planting of Lupinus, Aquilegia and Paeonia with Orlaya grandiflora surround black water pools - The Breakthrough Breast Cancer Garden, RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2015 - Design: Ruth Willmott, Sponsor: Breakthrough Breast Cancer - © Heather Edwards/GAP Photos

Soft pink planting of Lupinus, Aquilegia and Paeonia with Orlaya grandiflora surround black water pools – The Breakthrough Breast Cancer Garden, RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2015 – Design: Ruth Willmott, Sponsor: Breakthrough Breast Cancer – © Heather Edwards/GAP Photos

 

The ratio of pool to planting is also expertly executed in the M&G Garden, where Jo Thompson’s boardwalks sit above a central swimming pond. No one element dominates.

The M&G Garden, The Retreat - view toward oak summerhouse with wooden decking next to natural swimming pond pool acer hedging and irises next to water- designer Jo Thompson - sponsors, M &G Investments - awarded Silver Gilt - © Stephen Studd/GAP Photos

The M&G Garden, The Retreat – view toward oak summerhouse with wooden decking next to natural swimming pond pool acer hedging and irises next to water- designer Jo Thompson – sponsors, M &G Investments – awarded Silver Gilt – © Stephen Studd/GAP Photos

Beyond our Borders, designed by Sarah Eberle, uses striking pure aqua pools to represent oceans through which plant ailments can enter our countries. A gentle jet of water creates evolving, mesmerising ripples of sand. Kazuyuki Ishihara shows how water can be subtle in appearance, yet crucial to a soothing design formed of water-worn cobbles and globes of moss, in the Edo no Niwa garden. The result is an incredibly tranquil retreat that looks especially tempting after a day on your feet.

Edo no Niwa – Edo Garden by Ishihara Kazuyuki Design Laboratory. Designer: Kazuyuki Ishihara. Sponsors: Cainz Co Ltd, HB-101, jyutaro, Fudo Co Ltd, Nishitetsu Grand Hotel, British Airways, Cat's, Kubiki, Act, Shizuoka Sekisui Heim Exterior, Gunma Sekisui Heim Co Ltd. RHS Chelsea Flower Show - © Rob Whitworth/GAP Photos

Edo no Niwa – Edo Garden by Ishihara Kazuyuki Design Laboratory. Designer: Kazuyuki Ishihara. Sponsors: Cainz Co Ltd, HB-101, jyutaro, Fudo Co Ltd, Nishitetsu Grand Hotel, British Airways, Cat’s, Kubiki, Act, Shizuoka Sekisui Heim Exterior, Gunma Sekisui Heim Co Ltd. RHS Chelsea Flower Show – © Rob Whitworth/GAP Photos

 

A water wall formed of nylon string cloaked in continual droplets, constructed in the Thinking of Peace garden, is also incredibly calming.

The garden that makes the stongest use of water, though, is Fuminari Todkak’s Personal Universe garden. The prominent element – a cylindrical waterfall, suspended in mid air – show how exciting the addition of water can be to a garden. There is no escaping the sights and sounds that this material can bring.

Wild works

When top designers work alongside Mother Nature, you know you won’t be disappointed. Naturalistic plantings that echo wild flower meadows have been an important gardening trend in recent years, and 2015 is no exception at Chelsea. A popular method to achieve this is to plant in blocks. To recreate such a style at home follow three simple rules: choose knee- to waist-high plants, add low-growing grasses, and blend key plants together. Also present this year were less intense schemes that simply reflect how nature would set about ‘planting’ up a garden. Here are some great examples to inspire you:

The Breakthrough Breast Cancer garden shows the block method perfectly. Designer Ruth Willmott has chosen pink lupins, foxgloves and peonies as accent plants. All sitting below a canopy of multi-stemmed birches, while irises, grasses, linaria and orlaya fill the gaps, and hostas and strawberries provide a gradient towards the path edges. See this technique also at the Cloudy Bay Garden. Brothers Harry and David Rich are experts in natural plantings, and have the confidence to let grasses and other foliage accents to do the talking as equally as the flowers.

Cloudy Bay Garden in association with Vital Earth, moveable shack in the centre of the garden giving different perspectives of the garden-Designer: Harry and David Rich-Sponsor: Cloudy Bay / Bord na Mona, Gold Medal - © Maayke de Ridder/GAP Photos

Cloudy Bay Garden in association with Vital Earth, moveable shack in the centre of the garden giving different perspectives of the garden-Designer: Harry and David Rich-Sponsor: Cloudy Bay / Bord na Mona, Gold Medal – © Maayke de Ridder/GAP PhotosA white palette has been adpoted by Chorley Council in the , and Marcus Barnett has also chosen white – along with hints of yellow – for his naturalistic block plantings in the .

 

A white palette has been adpoted by Chorley Council in the Evaders Garden, and Marcus Barnett has also chosen white – along with hints of yellow – for his naturalistic block plantings in the Telegraph Garden.

The Telegraph Garden inspired by the De Stijl Movement. This geometric garden includes:  Tulipa 'Red Hat' and 'Spring Green'  Aquilegia vulgaris,Digitalis alba, Iris  sibirica 'Shirley Pope' with Carpinus betulus and Taxus baccata  cubed hedges.Designer: Marcus Barnett - Sponsors: The Telegraph - © Jacqui Hurst/GAP Photos

The Telegraph Garden inspired by the De Stijl Movement. This geometric garden includes: Tulipa ‘Red Hat’ and ‘Spring Green’ Aquilegia vulgaris,Digitalis alba, Iris sibirica ‘Shirley Pope’ with Carpinus betulus and Taxus baccata cubed hedges.Designer: Marcus Barnett – Sponsors: The Telegraph – © Jacqui Hurst/GAP Photos

More fragmented plantings that you might come across in a permanent plot are visible in the Laurent-Perrier Chatsworth Garden. Congratulations to designer Dan Pearson for being awarded Best in Show. This technique is also executed perfectly in the Water Station Garden and Brewin Dolphin Garden. We love the high-impact plantings of other show gardens but applaud these designers for showcasing a more realistic, achievable planting scheme.

The Lauren Perrier Chatsworth Garden, featuring the naturalism of Chatsworth and the wilder side of gardening, depicting the trout stream and Paxton's rockery - Designer: Dan Pearson - Sponsors: Champagne Laurent Perrier, Chatsworth - © Jenny Lilly/GAP Photos

The Lauren Perrier Chatsworth Garden, featuring the naturalism of Chatsworth and the wilder side of gardening, depicting the trout stream and Paxton’s rockery – Designer: Dan Pearson – Sponsors: Champagne Laurent Perrier, Chatsworth – © Jenny Lilly/GAP Photos