Category Archives: Plant focus

Succulents!

Mixed succulents in three metal pots displayed in metal tray with gravel surrounded by seaside items - © GAP Photos

Mixed succulents in three metal pots displayed in metal tray with gravel surrounded by seaside items – © GAP Photos

If you are on Instagram, you may be familiar with a new succulent trend which is gaining lots of popularity. It even has its own hashtag #succiepotinapot . Here at GAP we have had lots of fun recreating this design style and we’re really excited to share the results.


All you need are your succulents, succulent compost, gravel for topdressing and two different sized pots that complement each other. You can create all kinds of different styles; the possibilities are endless. Why not create a sea-side theme with galvanised containers, shells and driftwood, or more traditional look with terracotta? We also suggest using a dark gravel or topdressing to really make your succulents pop.

These containers will last for ages as they are, as long as they are kept in the right conditions. Remember that many succulents are tender, so need to be kept protected from colder temperatures. They also should be sheltered from the rain. A sunny porch or sheltered patio are ideal locations for these pots in the warmer months.

Have fun creating!

Microgreens

Miniature pots with microgreen on windsill - © GAP Photos

Miniature pots with microgreen on windsill – © GAP Photos

While growing vegetables and fruit from your garden is particularly rewarding, it isn’t always practical, especially if you don’t have an outdoor space of your own. However, if you have a sunny windowsill, why not try growing microgreens? Harvesting the baby leaves of many vegetable crops is an excellent way to add flavoursome garnishes to your dishes and get all the nutrients from the plants as well, and early spring is the perfect time to get started.


Most seeds will germinate efficiently in containers on warm windowsills – a handy place to harvest from too. Wait until the first true leaves start to appear and then just snip from the base of the stem for a beautiful and nutritious addition to a wide variety of meals. We recommend growing herbs such as sorrel and basil, and salad crops such as rocket and mustard. The fresh young leaves of pea shoots and beetroot also pack lots of flavour and texture.

Repotting a Phalaenopsis Orchid

Traditionally Phalaenopsis orchids are spring flowers, although these days they are available in flower year-round. Orchids actually like to have their roots restricted, however it is still good to do an annual check and repot if necessary. The start of the growing season is a great time to do this task.

Removing loose potting mix around the roots - © GAP Photos

Removing loose potting mix around the roots – © GAP Photos

1. Carefully ease the pot away and remove all the bark so you can see the root system clearly.

Carefully removing dead roots - © GAP Photos

Carefully removing dead roots – © GAP Photos

2. Healthy orchid roots will be a bright fresh green. Any dead and rotten roots can be cut off with clean scissors.

Adding Orchid potting mix - © GAP Photos

Adding Orchid potting mix – © GAP Photos

3. If you can get the roots back into the original pot without too much trouble, then there is no need to repot in a bigger pot. However, if you physically cannot get the root system back into the pot, then go for a clear orchid pot just one size up. Once you have the root system in place, then carefully add fresh orchid bark between the roots until the pot is full and the plant is secure.

Draining excess water from pot - © GAP Photos

Draining excess water from pot – © GAP Photos

4. If the roots are a silver colour, this means the plant is thirsty. You could use this opportunity to water the orchid by dunking the roots in clean tepid water. Use orchid feed to promote blooming.